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Buddhist Monastery

2007 University of Cincinnati Studio Project

This particular studio concerned the unique task of designing a Buddhist monastery just outside of the city of Cincinnati. The roughly 10,000 square foot building required a large meditation hall for 200 guests, meeting spaces, kitchens, as well as housing quarters for monks, an abbot, and several guests, among other spaces. The site was a very unique piece of land, a nearly 8 acre piece of meadow wedged between low density residential development, yet just a few thousand feet off the heavily developed and commercialized Colerain Avenue corridor. The studio was meant to be a comprehensive studio and demonstrate an understanding of all aspects of the architectural process; there was also an emphasis on sustainable principles. The final design is a product of several iterative studies on form, with the form reflecting a series of studies on site forces. The development of the site plan is a response to the forms existence on the existing site. The final project image gallery is above, and links to PDF's of the standalone presentation board and accompanying analysis booklet are below.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
1.

Main entrance to the monastery.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
2.

Floor plan: ground level.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
3.

Floor plan: main level.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
4.

Floor plan: upper level.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
5.

Rear of the building at night.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
6.

Interior view of the main lobby.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
7.

The main hall.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
8.

Exterior view from adjacent wooded area.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
9.

Upper level interior view.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
10.

Ground level axon.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
11.

Main level axon.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
12.

Upper level axon.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
13.

Overall building axon.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
14.

Overall site plan.

Crosley Annex/Urban Design
15.

Physical site model.

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